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Colloquialism Adds Character to Your Composition!

May 20,22

Colloquialism is the use of informal words and expressions in speech or writing. It is often used to add colour or character to a piece of writing. Colloquialisms are generally not considered appropriate for academic or business writing, but they can be used effectively in creative writing to create a more engaging and relatable piece.

Our GoAssignmentHelp essay writers love opportunities to flex their colloquial expertise while writing personal essays or short stories. Here are some examples of how they have used colloquialism in their work:

  • “The teacher’s pet is always the one who gets called on first.”
  • “I’m not going to sugarcoat it – that exam was brutal.”
  • “I’m pulling an all-nighter to finish this project.”

Colloquialism makes the paper more personal and down to earth. If used correctly, colloquialism can add humour, authenticity, or even pathos to your work. However, be careful not to overuse this literary device, as it can make your writing seem unprofessional or amateurish.

What can well-placed colloquialisms in your writing do?

  • Add personality and voice to your work

A good example of this is if you’re relating a personal experience. Adding in some of the phrases or words you would actually use, can bring the reader closer to you and your story.

For example, imagine you’re relating a time when you were very angry. You might write:

I was so angry I could have screamed.

But if you wanted to add some personality and voice, you might write:

I was so angry I could have spit nails.

The first sentence is fine, but the second gives the reader a better sense of who you are and how you react to strong emotions. It also sounds more like the way we actually speak, making it more relatable.

  • Make your writing more relatable and enjoyable to read

Colloquialisms can also make your writing more enjoyable to read. This is because they add in some of the same everyday language that we use when we’re talking to our friends.

For example, let’s say you’re writing about a time when you were very nervous. You might write:

I was so nervous I felt like I was going to vomit.

But if you wanted to make it more relatable and enjoyable to read, you might write:

I was so nervous I felt like I was going to puke.

Again, the first sentence is fine, but the second is more likely to resonate with your reader and be more enjoyable to read.

When you write the way you speak, readers feel like they’re getting to know the “real” you, which can make your writing more relatable, personal, and enjoyable.

  • Create a more intimate or conversational tone

Using colloquial language allows you to create a more intimate or conversational tone in your writing. This can be especially effective if you’re writing about a personal topic or experience.

For example, let’s say you want to write about a time when you were feeling sad and lonely. You might write:

I was feeling so sad and lonely that I felt like I was going to cry.

But if you wanted to create a more intimate or conversational tone, you might write:

I was feeling so sad and lonely that I felt like I needed a hug.

The first sentence is fine, but the second gives the reader a better sense of your emotional state and creates a more intimate tone.

  • Help you connect with your audience on a personal level

Many authors use colloquial language to bond with their readers instantly. This is because colloquialisms are often used in everyday conversation, so they can help you connect with your audience on a personal level.

For example, let’s say you want to write about a time when you were feeling frustrated. You might write:

I was feeling so frustrated I wanted to hit something.

But if you wanted to connect with your audience on a personal level, you might write:

I was feeling so frustrated I wanted to throw something.

The second sentence better expresses what you are going through and allows the reader to empathize with your frustration.

Also Read: Hyperbole Examples That Make English Interesting and Fun!

Tips to use colloquialisms correctly

Tips to use colloquialisms

Now that we’ve gone over some of the ways colloquialisms can improve your writing, let’s take a look at some tips on how to use them correctly:

 

  • Know your audience

 

Before you start sprinkling colloquialisms throughout your work, it’s important to know your audience. This is because some readers may not appreciate or understand them.

For example, if you’re writing for a more academic audience, they may not be familiar with certain slang terms or phrases. In this case, it’s probably best to avoid using colloquialisms altogether.

On the other hand, if you’re writing for a more general audience, they’re likely to be more receptive to colloquial language. Just be sure not to overdo it!

 

  • Use them sparingly

 

Even if you know your audience well, it’s important to use colloquialisms sparingly. This is because they can be distracting or even difficult to understand if used too frequently.

If you’re not sure whether or not to use a colloquialism, ask yourself if it’s essential to the point you’re trying to make. If not, it’s probably best to leave it out.

 

  • Choose wisely

 

When you do use colloquialisms, it’s important to choose them wisely. This is because some words and phrases may be considered offensive or inappropriate for certain audiences.

For example, if you’re writing for a family-friendly audience, you might want to avoid using terms that are profane or sexually explicit.

 

  • Define them

 

If you do use colloquialisms, be sure to define them for your reader. This is especially important if you’re writing for a general or global audience.

For example, if you use the term “soccer mom,” you might want to include a brief definition such as “a mother who spends a lot of time driving her children to soccer practice.”

 

  • Be consistent

 

Once you start using colloquialisms, it’s important to be consistent with their use. This means using them throughout your work, rather than randomly sprinkling them in here and there.

Some colloquialisms Americans often use

 

 

  • “Bless your heart” 

 

This is a phrase that is used to be polite, even if the person you are talking to is doing something foolish. For example, if someone tells you they just failed their driving test, you might say “bless your heart” to be polite.

 

  • “That’s the way the cookie crumbles” 

 

This phrase is used to describe how life can be unpredictable and unfair. For example, if you don’t get the job you wanted, you might say “that’s the way the cookie crumbles.”

 

  • “Don’t count your chickens before they hatch”

 

This phrase is used to warn people not to get too excited about something before it happens. For example, if you’re waiting to hear back from a job interview, you might say “don’t count your chickens before they hatch.”

 

  • “I could care less” 

 

This phrase is used to express how little you care about something. For example, if someone asks you if you like their new haircut and you don’t, you might say “I could care less.”

 

  • “That’s the pot calling the kettle black” 

 

This phrase is used to point out how someone is being hypocritical. For example, if someone criticizes you for being messy and they are also messy, you might say “that’s the pot calling the kettle black.”

 

  • “There’s more than one way to skin a cat” 

 

This phrase is used to describe how there are multiple ways to do something. For example, if you’re trying to figure out how to solve a problem, you might say “there’s more than one way to skin a cat.”

 

  • “That’ll be the day” 

 

This phrase is used to express how unlikely something is. For example, if someone says they’re going to win the lottery, you might say “that’ll be the day.”

 

  • “You can’t judge a book by its cover” 

 

This phrase is used to warn people not to make assumptions about someone or something based on their appearance. For example, if you meet someone who doesn’t look friendly but they turn out to be nice, you might say “you can’t judge a book by its cover.”

 

  • “I’ll bet” 

 

This phrase is used to express disbelief or doubt. For example, if someone tells you they saw a UFO, you might say “I’ll bet.”

 

  • “That takes the cake” 

 

This phrase is used to describe how something is the worst or most outrageous example of its kind. For example, if you see a news story about a politician who was caught cheating, you might say “that takes the cake.”

Also Read: How to make your writing better with transition words and phrases?

Colloquialisms are a great way to add character to your writing. Just be sure to use them wisely and be consistent with their use. With a little practice, you’ll be using them like a native speaker in no time!

 

Do you have any favourite colloquialisms? Share them in the comments below!

May 20, 2022

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